Dr. William Ting, Board-Certified Dermatologist
at California Dermatology Care

2262 Camino Ramon, San Ramon, CA 94583
Tel: 925-328-0255
Email: staff@CalDermCare.com


Advanced Care with a Personal Touch

   

 

 

Medical Dermatology    Evidence-based medicine   Customized solution   Personal care

Latest Dermatology Headlines

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(email staff to get your personal passcode)

* Patient Biopsy Results via LabCalls


MEDICAL DERMATOLOGY

Acne and Acne Scar

Excimer Laser for Psoriasis & Vitiligo

Keloid & Hypertrophic Scar Laser Therapy

Mohs Surgery for Skin Cancers

Nail Fungus GenesisPlus Laser Therapy

Photodynamic Therapy

Psoriasis & NBUVB Phototherapy

RadioTherapy Nonsurgical SRT-100 for Skin Cancer

Skin Allergy Patch Test

Sweating Disorder MiraDry for Hyperhidrosis

Wart Laser Therapy


COSMETIC DERMATOLOGY

Aesthetician Services
Microdermabrasion
 

Botox, Dysport & Xeomin

Cellulaze Cellulite Therapy

new! CoolSculpting

Facial Redness/Vein Laser Therapy

Fillers injection for Wrinkles

Fractional CO2 laser

new! Hair Transplant with Neograft

Laser Surgery Services
Acne/Pore reducing Laser
Collagen Stimulating Laser
Excimer Laser
Facial Veins laser
Hair Laser Removal
IPL Fotofacial
Melasma Laser
Nail Fungus Laser
Resurfacing Laser
Scar revision Laser
Tattoo Removal Lasers
VBeam Pulse Dye Laser
Wart Laser


Latisse

Leg Vein Laser Therapy & Asclera Sclerotherapy

Liposonix + Vaser Shape Nonsurgical Body Sculpting
 

Melasma and Pigmentation

Pore Size Reduction and Laser Rejuvenation

Sculptra Liquid Facelift

SideLaze Lift

Ulthera natural lift & skin tightening of face and neck


Related Websites
FaceUpLifting.com
iCellulaze.com
MoreHair4Me.com
SideLazeLift.com
SonixLipo.com


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925-328-0255

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* Review Dr. Ting's 717+ Q&A on RealSelf

Dr. William Ting has expertise in treating the entire spectrum of medical dermatology, with emphasis in preventive medicine and personalized recommendations. He enjoys taking care of patients with acne, eczema, hair and nail disorders, rashes, psoriasis and skin cancers.

He is at the forefront of medical dermatology and dermatologic research. He continues to publish articles in peer-reviewed dermatology journals. He is an early pioneer of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and one of the most experienced practitioners of PDT in the Bay Area. He is the first dermatologist in the San Francisco Bay Area and Northern California to introduce Lutronic Spectra Laser for melasma, acne, scar revision, pore size reduction as well as the Cutera GenesisPlus laser for advanced nail fungus laser treatment, keloid and hypertrophic scar, warts and scar revision.

Dr. Ting is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) and American Society of Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS). He is a member of the National Psoriasis Foundation and International Hyperhidrosis Society.

Innovative Therapeutic Approach to Common Skin Conditions

Acne

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

Hair and Nail disorders

  • Maximize therapeutic synergy and efficacy by utilizing both prescription-strength and over-the counter products when available
  • Comprehensive workup including bloodwork and biopsy if necessary
  • Systemic oral hormonal therapy for women and men when indicated

Psoriasis 

Rosacea

  • Multi-prong approach to minimize redness
  • Low-dose 'non-antibiotic' anti-inflammatory oral medication for long-term remission 
  • Emphasis on prevention
  • Fotofacial/IPL laser utilizing Cynosure XPL/Elite MPX
  • Cutera GenesisPlus Laser with or without combination with IPL 
  • Diode laser for facial veins
  • VBeam Pulse Dye Laser, the new gold standard for rosacea and facial redness

Skin Cancer 

  • Emphasis on prophylactic treatments with topical 5-FU, imiquimod, diclofenac, ingenol mebutate and oral chemopreventive therapy such as Soriatane.
  • Reduce future risks of skin cancer with photodynamic therapy, TCA chemical peels and/or fractional CO2 resurfacing laser  
  • Mohs Surgery to achieve highest cure rate and tissue sparing
  • Close colloboration with plastic surgeon(s) as needed  

Sweating Disorder (Hyperhidrosis) 

Vitiligo

Warts 


ABCD of Mole Check

 

 

Common Medical Dermatology Diagnostics and Therapeutics:

Dermatology Links:

American Academy of Dermatology
American Society of Dermatologic Surgery
American Society of Mohs Surgery
International Hyperhidrosis Society
National Psoriasis Foundation

 Latest Dermatology Headlines:

Latest Dermatology Headlines
Thu, 27 Nov 2014 17:15:27 +0100

http://www.medworm.com/rss/index.php/Dermatology/12/

Nov 27, 2014 09:14AM

Why teledermatology should be used in Iran: background, infrastructures and technical consideration

(Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology)

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Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Clinical aspects of leprosy

Leprosy is a chronic, infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It mainly affects the peripheral nervous system, skin, and certain other tissues such as the reticulo-endothelial system, bones and joints, mucous membranes, eyes, testes, muscles, and adrenals. Leprosy clinical presentation varies from few to widespread lesions. In most patients, early leprosy presents as macular and hypopigmented lesions. This initial clinical presentation is known as indeterminate leprosy and occurs in individuals who have not developed cell-mediated immunity against M leprae yet. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

The armadillo as an animal model and reservoir host for

Apart from humans, armadillos are the only known natural hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. They are well developed as hosts for in vivo propagation of M leprae and are advancing as models for studying the pathogenesis of leprosy and translational research. Armadillos are immunologically intact. They exhibit the full Ridley-Jopling spectrum of histopathologic responses to M leprae and uniquely manifest extensive neurological involvement that closely recapitulates human leprosy. In addition, free-ranging armadillos in some regions are known to harbor a naturally occurring infection with M leprae, and zoonotic transmission between armadillos and humans has been implicated in a large number of new case presentations. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Treatment of leprosy

Leprosy is a curable disease, having been eliminated from many countries, including India. This has been possible due to the wide availability of effective and safe drugs. Treatment of leprosy has undergone considerable changes over decades, from chaulmoogra oil in 1915 to dapsone monotherapy in 1946, then eventually to multidrug therapy (MDT) in 1982. In the last two decades, reports of resistance to all first-line drugs have appeared in the literature, with the need to conduct clinical trials using newer but highly bactericidal drugs and their combinations against Mycobacterium leprae. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Leprosy: A glossary

Leprosy continues to afflict residents from a number of countries in Africa, South America, and southeast Asia, despite the marked reduction in the number of cases of leprosy worldwide, after the introduction of the multidrug regimens as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-MDT). With the increasing immigration of individuals from risk areas to Europe and the United States, knowledge of the basic concepts of leprosy would be helpful to clinicians caring for immigrants in nonendemic areas. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Immunology of leprosy and diagnostic challenges

Leprosy, caused by noncultivable Mycobacterium leprae (ML), has varied manifestations, which are associated with the host immune responses. The dermal involvement is accompanied by peripheral nerve damage, which leads to sensory motor loss and deformities. Both innate and acquired immune responses are involved. The main cell to be compromised is the CD4 + T helper cell, which shows antigen specific unresponsiveness to only ML and not to other common antigens in the bacilliferous generalized lepromatous form of the disease. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

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Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Lucio?s leprosy: A clinical and therapeutic challenge

Leprosy has been a challenge in different areas of medicine; in underdeveloped countries it remains a public health problem, in which the social and economic problems facilitate the disease persistence. The diagnosis and consequently the treatment are delayed due to the clinical polymorphism of leprosy, which especially at the beginning the manifestations are not as evident, as is the case of diffuse lepromatous leprosy. This favors the disabilities and the development of the reaction episodes. Fortunately, reaction episodes have decreased with the use of multidrug therapy, and better control of the type 2 reactions has been managed with the use of thalidomide, as in Lucio?s phenomenon. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Ocular leprosy

Ocular involvement in leprosy is estimated to be 70-75%, about 10-50% of leprosy patients suffer from severe ocular symptoms, and blindness occurs in about 5% of patients. The disease leads to many ophthalmologic symptoms and signs in the range of the eyeball itself, as well as of the bulb adnexa, ie, eyebrows, eyelids with eyelashes, and lacrimal drainage system. Especially dangerous are complications of lagophthalmos and corneal hypoanesthesia, neurotrophic or infectious keratitis, and iridocyclitis and cataract formation, which may lead to significant decrease of visual acuity or even blindness. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Lepra: Various etiologies from miasma to bacteriology and genetics

Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mycobacterium leprae. There have been various beliefs in its etiology with two main concepts emerging: anticontagion and contagion. From ancient times through the early Middle Ages, the miasmatic theory of leprosy was the main anticontagion view. The development of histopathologic and cytologic studies in the second half of the 19th century provided a starting point to explain the etiology of leprosy bacteriologically. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Jan Evangelista Purkynje (1787?1869): First to describe fingerprints

Fingerprints have been used for years as the accepted tool in criminology and for identification. The first system of classification of fingerprints was introduced by Jan Evangelista Purkynje (1787?1869), a Czech physiologist, in 1823. He divided the papillary lines into nine types, based on their geometric arrangement. This work, however, was not recognized internationally for many years. In 1858, Sir William Herschel (1833?1917) registered fingerprints for those signing documents at the Indian magistrate?s office in Jungipoor. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Protecting people against leprosy: Chemoprophylaxis and immunoprophylaxis

Elimination of leprosy cannot be achieved by multidrug therapy alone, and new tools are needed to prevent leprosy. A randomized controlled trial with chemoprophylaxis for contacts of leprosy patients using a single dose of rifampicin (SDR) has shown an overall protective effect of approximately 60%, effective in the first 2 years after the intervention. When a contact who previously received bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination also receives SDR, the protective effect is additive, approximating 80%. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

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Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy

All patients with leprosy have some degree of nerve involvement. Perineural inflammation is the histopathologic hallmark of leprosy, and this localization may reflect a vascular route of entry of Mycobacterium leprae into nerves. Once inside nerves, M leprae are ingested by Schwann cells, with a wide array of consequences. Axonal atrophy may occur early in this process; ultimately, affected nerves undergo segmental demyelination. Knowledge of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy has been greatly limited by the minimal opportunities to study affected nerves in man. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Struck by lightning: Lichtenberg figures on a 19th-century wax model

Wax models in dermatology were used to a large extent until the 1930s as three-dimensional models to illustrate various pathologic conditions and in particular cutaneous signs of disease. As an example, a young woman who was struck by lightning and developed Lichtenberg figures is presented. Lichtenberg figures are a fernlike pattern on skin, characteristic of lightning. Such a wax model housed in the German Hygiene Museum Dresden, Germany, illustrates the significance of wax models and how, even today, they can play an important role in medical education. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Histopathology of the lepromatous skin biopsy

The histopathology of lepromatous skin varies according to the cell-mediated immunity of the host against Mycobacterium leprae. In tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy, epithelioid noncaseating granulomas predominate, and acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are absent or only rarely present. In borderline lepromatous and lepromatous leprosy, the infiltrate is composed of macrophages with a vacuolar cytoplasm, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. AFB are numerous. Edema inside and outside the epithelioid granulomas, together with the appearance of large giant cells, are the main features of type 1 reactions. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Leprosy?An intriguing disease

On February 28, 1873, the scientific world was shocked when Dr. Armaeur Hansen announced in Bergen, Norway that leprosy was caused directly by bacteria.1 It was no longer hereditary, due to a curse or the result of a sin. Most of his colleagues and physicians elsewhere laughed; however, he was right. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Genetics of leprosy: Expected and unexpected developments and perspectives

A solid body of evidence produced over decades of intense research supports the hypothesis that leprosy phenotypes are largely dependent on the genetic characteristics of the host. The early evidence of a major gene effect controlling susceptibility to leprosy came from studies of familial aggregation, twins, and Complex Segregation Analysis. Later, linkage and association analysis, first applied to the investigation of candidate genes and chromosomal regions and more recently, to genome-wide scans, have revealed several leukocyte antigen complex and nonleukocyte antigen complex gene variants as risk factors for leprosy phenotypes such as disease per se, its clinical forms and leprosy reactions. (Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

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Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Contents

(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:13AM

Editorial Board

(Source: Clinics in Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Management of Hidradenitis Suppurativa with Biological Therapy: Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature

Several studies report the usefulness of different biological therapies in the management of a difficult-to-treat pathology such as hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). However, there are little data on this, which shows the great difficulty in the management of this disease. We will report herein our experience of the treatment of four complex cases of HS. We will also review previous cases published in the literature in order to further assess the results obtained with different biological drugs in terms of efficacy and safety. We conclude that, in the near future, biological therapy could become an essential tool in the management of cases of HS who have not previously responded to classical treatment. (Source: Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Gene Expression Profiling in Melasma in Korean Women

Conclusion: This result suggests that the pathogenesis of melasma might be associated with novel genes involved in the above signaling pathway in Korean women. (Source: Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Complete Recovery of a Wide Local Reaction by the Use of Dexrazoxane 72 Hours after Epirubicin Extravasation: Case Report and Review of the Literature

Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a successful treatment and complete recovery by the use of dexrazoxane even 3 days after extensive epirubicin extravasation. Additionally, a review of the literature is given. (Source: Dermatology)

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Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Dermoscopy, Reflectance Confocal Microscopy and Immunohistochemical Analysis in Melanocytic Lesions with Meyerson's Phenomenon

Conclusion: Our case series supports the potential of RCM in the evaluation of tumoral and inflammatory skin diseases. RCM features of rare Meyerson's melanoma were also described for the first time. (Source: Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Acrodermatitis Continua of Hallopeau Treated Successfully with Ustekinumab and Acitretin after Failure of Tumour Necrosis Factor Blockade and Anakinra

We report herein the case of a 53-year-old patient whose ACH was refractory to all conventional systemic treatment modalities and to anti-tumour necrosis factor. Because he had increased plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1?, he received anakinra for 7 weeks, without further improvement however. Achievement of complete response was obtained with ustekinumab 90 mg s.c. every 12 weeks combined with acitretin; the plasma level of IL-1? concomitantly returned to normal. This case report is associated with a review on recent data on ACH treatment with biological agents, including anakinra and ustekinumab.Dermatology (Source: Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Does the New Staging System Proposed for Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome Provide Reliable Agreement for T1 and T2 Disease

Conclusion: The new system for MF staging carries a significant risk of disagreement regarding patch and plaque subsets.Dermatology (Source: Dermatology)

Nov 27, 2014 09:12AM

Complete Remission of Schnitzler Syndrome and Waldenström Macroglobulinemia under Rituximab-Cyclophosphamide-Dexamethasone

In Schnitzler syndrome, which is mostly diagnosed with a low and asymptomatic monoclonal peak, anakinra has always exhibited a complete but only transient control of the auto-inflammatory signs, which are induced by interleukin (IL)-1 auto-activation. We focused on the treatment of a case of Schnitzler syndrome with moderate macroglobulinemia peak. Anakinra failed to improve the severe inflammatory anaemia and the dysglobulinemia, but rituximab-dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy alone allowed a complete response. The correlation between the clinical, pro-inflammatory cytokines and dysglobulinemia complete controls with chemotherapy proves the following: (1) the dual action of this treatment in both the auto-inflammatory and dysglobulinemia components of the syndrome and (2) a diff...

Nov 27, 2014 09:11AM

Differential expression patterns of metastasis suppressor proteins in basal cell carcinoma

ConclusionThe relatively preserved levels of NM23?H1, NDRG1, and E?cadherin proteins may have a positive effect on the non?metastasizing features of these tumors. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

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Nov 27, 2014 07:11AM

The role of microRNAs in autoimmune diseases with skin involvement

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology)

Nov 27, 2014 07:10AM

Management of urticaria: not too complicated, not too simple

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: Clinical and Experimental Allergy)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Dermatoglyphic patterns as possible predictor of treatment resistance in schizophrenia

This study was done to determine whether abnormal neurodevelopmental markers were more frequent in schizophrenics non-responsive to routine treatment and whether treatment resistance can be predicted by studying the dermatoglyphic profile of an individual. Methods Finger and palm prints of 144 schizophrenic patients responsive to treatment and 44 schizophrenic patients non-responsive were taken. Finger print patterns, palmar patterns, palmar flexion creases, total ridge counts and atd angles were studied. The analysis was done using SPSS 11.0. Results The results showed there was increased pattern frequency in the I3 area of the left hand of non-responders and in the I4 area of the right hand of responders. atd angle was decreased in the left hand of non-responders. There was increased f...

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

A New Modification of C?V Flap Technique in Nipple Reconstruction: Rolled Triangular Dermal-Fat Flaps

In this study, a simple modification of the C?V flap technique designed to maintain the neo-nipple projection performed as the last stage of breast reconstruction is described. The technique was used in seventeen patients who were treated with breast reconstruction using the transverse rectus abdominis flap. Except for one patient with a 2.3 mm decrease in nipple projection, the projection of all neo-nipples was preserved at the end of the mean follow-up period of 19.4 months. According to the results of our study, modifying the C?V flap technique by adding rolled triangular dermal-fat flaps improves the long-term maintenance of neo-nipple projection. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each arti...

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Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

In vitro activity of antiseptic solutions against Madurella mycetomatis, implications on eumycetoma management

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: British Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Dermoscopic features of congenital acral melanocytic naevi in children: a prospective comparative and follow?up study

ConclusionsCAMNs in children have specific features compared with AAMNs. Our results suggest that small CAMNs need not be excised, but should be followed up. (Source: British Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Prognostic factors in localized invasive primary cutaneous malignant melanoma: results of a large population?based study

ConclusionsDeterminants of increased risk of CMM death in stage I and II CMMs were increasing T?stage, presence of ulceration, presence of mitoses and VGP. This was not found for TILs or regression. (Source: British Journal of Dermatology)

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Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin: epidemiology, classification, management, and novel trends

We describe the salient features of cutaneous SCC. We also review novel classification schemes proposed during the last decade which attempt to stratify SCC lesions based on prognosis. Biopsy leads to definitive diagnosis. Treatment includes surgical excision; Mohs micrographic surgery produces excellent cure rates and spares the maximal amount of tissue. Other modalities include electrodessication and curettage, cryosurgery, radiotherapy, topical medications, photodynamic therapy, and systemic therapy. Management and follow?up depend on the risk stratification of individual lesions. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Pediatric Sweet syndrome. A retrospective study

ConclusionsSweet syndrome is an extremely rare diagnosis in children. It is associated with the same conditions as in adults, but it is more frequently associated with infections than malignancies. In general, prognosis is good, but recurrences occur and second?line treatment may be needed. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Association of HLA?B*1502 allele with lamotrigine?induced Stevens?Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Han Chinese subjects: a meta?analysis

ConclusionsWe found a statistical association between HLA?B*1502 and lamotrigine?induced SJS/TEN in Han Chinese subjects. Future studies with larger sample sizes are suggested to verify the results. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Fingerprint verification prediction model in hand dermatitis

ConclusionsThe derived fingerprint verification failure prediction model is validated and highly discriminatory in predicting risk of fingerprint verification in patients with hand dermatitis. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

A survey of self?reported skin disease in the elderly African?American population

ConclusionsThis study provides an important overview of the most common self?reported skin conditions in elderly African?Americans. Substantial age?related differences in the frequencies of skin disorders were apparent. It is important to include the elderly population within campaigns to educate minority group members on skin cancer. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

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Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Increased serum levels of interleukin?23 circulating in patients with non?segmental generalized vitiligo

ConclusionsThe inhibition of IL?23 might be a novel strategy in the therapy of autoimmune inflammatory diseases like vitiligo. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Are all patients with psoriasis at increased risk for coronary artery disease?

Abstract Associations have been recently recognized between psoriasis and an increased incidence of atherosclerotic diseases. However, there are scarce data on the prevalence of coronary lesions in patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to identify the calcified and non?calcified atherosclerotic coronary lesions in patients with psoriasis compared to controls. Forty patients with psoriasis and 42 control subjects matched for age, sex, and cardiovascular risk profile were included in this case?control study. Coronary lesions were evaluated by a 128?slice dual source multidetector computed tomography scanner. Coronary calcification scoring was calculated according to the Agatston score. The prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary lesions (psoriasis: 15%, controls: 16.7%; P ...

Nov 26, 2014 04:00PM

Chronic recurrent annular neutrophilic dermatosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis

Publication date: December 2014 Source:Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition), Volume 105, Issue 10 Author(s): J.M. Mir-Bonafé , J.C. Santos-Durán , A. Santos-Briz , E. Fernández-López (Source: Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas)

Nov 26, 2014 06:32AM

CMS proposes new network, formulary standards for 2016 ACA plans

The Obama Administration is proposing to widen provider networks and increase access to prescription drugs in health plans that participate in marketplace plans in 2016. ?It is one of our many goals to strengthen the integrity of programs that fall under the Affordable Care Act to ensure the...googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-cta'); (Source: Skin and Allergy News)

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Nov 25, 2014 11:00PM

Infants With Eczema May Be More Prone to Peanut Allergy: Study

Title: Infants With Eczema May Be More Prone to Peanut Allergy: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/25/2014 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/26/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Lung squamous carcinoma with two paraneoplastic syndromes: dermatomyositis and Lambert?Eaton myasthenic syndrome

ConclusionRecognition of paraneoplastic syndrome is crucial for early diagnosis of lung cancer because up to 80% of patients may present paraneoplastic syndromes before any other direct indication of malignancy. Early diagnosis and treatment of paraneoplastic syndrome is also important because delayed diagnosis may result in rapid disease progression and irreversible neurological damage. (Source: The Clinical Respiratory Journal)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

[Research Articles] Genetically corrected iPSCs as cell therapy for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen, resulting in fragile skin and mucous membranes that blister easily in response to mechanical stress. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) carry the potential to fundamentally change cell-based therapies for human diseases, in particular for RDEB, for which no effective treatments are available. To provide proof of principle on the applicability of iPSCs for the treatment of RDEB, we developed iPSCs from type VII collagen (Col7a1) mutant mice that exhibited skin fragility and blistering resembling human RDEB. Genetically repaired iPSCs could be differentiated into functional fibroblasts that reexpressed and secreted type VII collagen. Corrected iPSC–derived fibroblasts di...

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

AKT hyper-phosphorylation associated with PI3K mutations in lymphatic endothelial cells from a patient with lymphatic malformation

Abstract Lymphatic malformations (LM) are characterized by abnormal formation of lymphatic vessels and tissue overgrowth. The lymphatic vessels present in LM lesions may become blocked and enlarged as lymphatic fluid collects, forming a mass or cyst. Lesions are typically diagnosed during childhood and are often disfiguring and life threatening. Available treatments consist of sclerotherapy, surgical removal and therapies to diminish complications. We isolated lymphatic endothelial cells (LM-LEC) from a surgically removed microcystic LM lesion. LM-LEC and normal human dermal-LEC (HD-LEC) expressed endothelial (CD31, VE-Cadherin) as well as lymphatic endothelial (Podoplanin, PROX1, LYVE1)-specific markers. Targeted gene sequencing analysis in patient-derived LM-LEC revealed the pre...

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Innate lymphoid cells and the skin

Innate lymphoid cells are an emerging family of effector cells that contribute to lymphoid organogenesis, metabolism, tissue remodelling and protection against infections. They maintain homeostatic immunity at barrier surfaces such as lung, skin and gut (Nature 464:1367-1371, 2010, Nat Rev Immunol 13: 145-149, 2013). Several human and mouse studies suggest a role for innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory skin conditions including atopic eczema and psoriasis. Here we review the innate lymphoid cell family and discuss their function in the skin and during inflammation. (Source: BMC Dermatology)

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Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Four cases of Japanese patients with psoriatic arthritis in whom effective treatments by anti?tumor necrosis factor?? drugs were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging together with improvement of skin lesions

We present four cases of Japanese patients with PsA in whom effective treatments by anti?TNF?? drugs were evaluated by contrast?enhanced MRI. This imaging enables dermatologists and radiologists to assess and monitor early inflammatory changes, and to grant PsA patients earlier access to modern treatment such as biologics. (Source: The Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Angiosarcoma of the scalp in a patient with systemic sclerosis

(Source: The Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Ionizing irradiation inhibits keloid fibroblast cell proliferation and induces premature cellular senescence

In this study, we used primary keloid fibroblasts (KFb) isolated from patient samples to investigate the effects of X?ray radiation on cell proliferation, cell toxicity and cell cycle, as detected by CCK?8 assay kit and flow cytometer. In addition, we examined senescence?associated ??galactosidase activity and the associated gene expression using real?time polymerase chain reaction and western blot in KFb exposed to X?ray radiation. X?ray radiation inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell senescence in KFb in a dose?dependent manner. Inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cellular senescence were mediated by interruption of the cell cycle with an extended G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, the expressions of senescence?associated genes p21, p16 and p27 were upregu...

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Evaluation of candidal colonization and specific humoral responses against Candida albicans in patients with psoriasis

ConclusionsThe results of the present study show a higher rate of candidal colonization in patients with psoriasis in comparison with controls and a reduction in humoral immune responses in patients. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

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Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Investigations of the efficacy of diphenylcyclopropenone immunotherapy for the treatment of warts

ConclusionsImmunotherapy with DPCP is an effective and well?tolerated option for the treatment of recalcitrant warts. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Efficacy of intralesional bleomycin for the treatment of plantar hard corns

ConclusionsThis study provides evidence that intralesional bleomycin (1 mg/ml) injection could be one of the ideal treatments for corn. Intralesional bleomycin is particularly useful for reducing lesional pain and size within a short period. (Source: International Journal of Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

TNF inhibitors directly target Th17 cells via attenuation of autonomous TNF/TNFR2 signaling in psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by increased proliferation and altered differentiation of the epidermis and inflammatory cell infiltrates in the dermis. A number of recent studies have demonstrated that the IL-23/Th17 axis is essential for the pathogenesis of psoriasis [1]. The therapeutic efficacy of antibodies to IL-23, including those targeting either the p40 or the p19 subunit, has confirmed the role of IL-23, which is a driver for Th17 cells to mature and proliferate [2]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Crusted (Norwegian) scabies: an under?recognized infestation characterized by an atypical presentation and delayed diagnosis

(Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

100 years of Wood's lamp revised

Abstract The Wood's lamp is a diagnostic tool in dermatology. Unfortunately, this useful tool is often overlooked in the busy and hectic outdoor dermatology clinic. To emphasize its value in modern dermatology, we present an updated review of the principles and applications and shed new light on its proper place in our practice. (Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology)

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Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

The ratio of non?hyperkeratotic and hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis in a high?risk non?melanoma skin cancer cohort in Queensland

(Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Actinic keratosis with atypical basal cells (AK I) is the most common lesion associated with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

ConclusionDirect invasion from proliferating basaloid atypical keratinocytes limited to the epidermal basal layer (AK I), known as the differentiated pathway, was the most common form of progression to cutaneous iSCC in our series. On the other hand, stepwise progression from AK I to AK II and AK III (classic pathway) was seen to be operative in a substantial proportion of iSCC cases. All AK lesions, irrespective of intraepidermal neoplasia thickness, are therefore potentially invasive and tumour advance along adnexal structures might facilitate iSCC development from AK I lesions. (Source: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Sexual dysfunction in psoriasis: a systematic review

Abstract BackgroundPsoriasis has been associated with numerous psychological disorders such as low self?esteem, depression, anxiety, sexual dysfunction or suicidal ideation. Recently, there has been a progressive increase in studies examining the impact of psoriasis on sexual function. This alteration seems to be considerable and can cause significant changes in quality of life. ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to elaborate recommendations for psoriasis and sexual function supported by a systematic review, to facilitate the application of new scientific findings into clinical practice and to serve as a basis for conducting future research. MethodsWe performed a systematic review of the available studies on psoriasis and sexual dysfunction. ResultsScientific evidence shows that psoriasi...

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

MEK Inhibitor?Induced Dusky Erythema Characteristic Drug Hypersensitivity Manifestation in 3 Patients

Conclusions and RelevanceThe typical skin reaction associated with MEK inhibitors is a papulopustular eruption. To our knowledge, the dusky erythema that occurred in the 3 patients described here has not previously been reported for this drug class. (Source: JAMA Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Homozygous Missense Mutation in IL36RN in Generalized Pustular Dermatosis With Intraoral Involvement Compatible With Both AGEP and Generalized Pustular Psoriasis

Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) show multiple overlapping clinical features. Recently, mutations in the IL36RN gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra) have been found to cause increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines in GPP and in a subset of AGEP. In both conditions, half of the patients with IL36RN variants had oral involvement. (Source: JAMA Dermatology)

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Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

A 2-Year-Old Girl With Skin Fragility

(Source: JAMA Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 04:00PM

Cutaneous Adverse Effects Associated With the Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitor Cabozantinib

Conclusions and RelevanceCabozantinib monotherapy is associated with 1 or more cutaneous adverse events in most patients. Early detection and prompt treatment may increase patients? adherence to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.Trial Registrationclinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01688999 (Source: JAMA Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 02:59PM

The ?Pantie' Tumour

We present a case of radiation-associated angiosarcoma. A 67-year-old Thai woman was diagnosed with endometrium carcinoma stage IC and was treated with surgery and radiations. Ten years later, she presented with a gradually enlarging mass on the pubic area, in the shape of a pair of panties. Skin biopsy of lesions confirmed angiosarcoma. The diagnosis was radiation-associated angiosarcoma. She was treated with chemotherapy due to unresectable tumour. The chemotherapy was started with paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 every 2 weeks. After completing the fifth cycle of paclitaxel, the lesion was markedly decreased in size and the symptoms previously described were also completely resolved.Case Rep Dermatol 2014;6:274-278 (Source: Case Reports in Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Psoriasis and the Life Cycle of Persistent Life Effects

Psoriasis is associated with significant physical, social, and behavioral comorbidities that create a substantial burden. We outline herein that these comorbidities start early in life and persist for decades, ultimately impacting the entire life course of patients with psoriasis. By highlighting the ages that psoriasis patients are affected with physical, social, behavioral and emotional comorbidities, we demonstrate the age-appropriate considerations for psoriasis patients. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

The Immunopathogenesis of Psoriasis

Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that results from the complex interplay between keratinocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Keratinocytes trigger innate and adaptive immune responses. Dermal myeloid dendritic cells regulate T cell activation and production of cytokines and chemokines that amplify inflammation. Most of the psoriatic T cells discretely produce interferon-?, interleukin (IL)-17, and IL-22. The initiation phase of psoriasis involves Toll-like receptors, antimicrobial peptide LL37, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Keratinocytes are the main cutaneous cell type expressing IL-17 receptors and hence the immune circuit is amplified by keratinocytes upregulating mRNAs for a range of inflammatory products. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Genetics of Psoriasis

This article focuses on the results of genetic association studies, which provide evidence that psoriasis susceptibility genes are involved in innate and adaptive immunity and skin barrier functions. The potential for disease stratification and the development of more effective treatments with fewer side effects using genetic data are highlighted. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Ten Years On

This review delivers a commentary on the first decade of biologics? use in psoriasis and provides a glimpse of the pipeline of therapies currently in development for psoriasis that will enhance the therapeutic armamentarium available to the dermatologist. In addition, the authors revisit the rationale for the development of biological therapies, inventory the available therapies of today, and retrospectively assess their impact on the dermatology practice as it relates to the management of patients with psoriasis. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Current and Future Oral Systemic Therapies for Psoriasis

For patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, there is a large range of variably effective and safe oral, systemic medications. With appropriate monitoring, these therapies may be used as either monotherapy or in combination with other therapies. Newer drugs in the research pipeline hold significant promise. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Phototherapy and Photochemotherapy for Psoriasis

Phototherapy is a first-line option for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis. Systematic reviews indicate near comparable efficacy of the different forms of phototherapy. Localized phototherapy can be an adjunctive treatment of recalcitrant plaques during systemic treatment of psoriasis. More than 200 psoralen?UV-A therapy treatment sessions is associated with an increased risk of keratinocytic cancers, whereas no increased risk has been demonstrated for narrow-band UV-B therapy. The mechanism of action of phototherapy in psoriasis is via inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation; induction of apoptosis in keratinocytes, dendritic, and T cells; and inhibition of Th1 and Th17 pathways, but activation of Th2. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

An Update on Topical Therapies for Mild-Moderate Psoriasis

Topical therapies are the mainstream treatment of psoriasis because most patients have mild disease. First-line treatments are vitamin D derivatives and corticosteroids. These treatments are usually given in combination schedules. For topical treatments the selection of the most appropriate vehicle is of major importance, thus improving adherence to the treatment, which frequently is impaired by the complexities of topical therapeutic choices. Evidence for efficacy and safety of topical treatments is readily available for vitamin D treatments and short-term treatment with corticosteroids. However, the scientific evidence for longer-term treatments is limited. Multiple new small molecules are in various stages of development and are reviewed. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Assessing Psoriasis Severity and Outcomes for Clinical Trials and Routine Clinical Practice

Psoriasis is a complex disease. Dermatologists have not documented psoriasis severity, except in clinical trials; doing so requires tools for assessing psoriasis and an understanding of what changes in those assessments mean in terms of outcome. Two psoriasis assessment tools have dominated: The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. There are advantages and disadvantages to each. Newer instruments may not be more suitable for documenting psoriasis. There may be benefits in terms of patient ownership of disease management from using self-assessment tools for documenting severity, for example, the Self-assessment version of the Simplified Psoriasis Index. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Psoriasis Is a Systemic Disease with Multiple Cardiovascular and Metabolic Comorbidities

This article summarizes the current literature on cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities in psoriasis, identifies research gaps, and suggests management strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

The International Psoriasis Council: Advancing Knowledge, Enhancing Care

Founded in 2004, the International Psoriasis Council (IPC) is a dermatology-led, voluntary, global nonprofit organization dedicated to innovation across the full spectrum of psoriasis through research, education, and patient care. The IPC?s mission is to empower our network of global key opinion leaders to advance knowledge about psoriasis and its associated comorbidities, thereby enhancing the care of patients worldwide. The IPC provides a forum for education, collaboration, and innovation among physicians, researchers, and other professionals working on the physical, economic, and social aspects of psoriasis and its associated comorbidities (www.psoriasiscouncil.org). (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Psoriasis

The umbrella term psoriasis is now understood to incorporate several distinct phenotypes or endotypes along the disease spectrum that in turn will dictate different therapies. A stratified medicine approach to psoriasis using this clinical information coupled with pharmacogenomic and immunologic data will become more widely acceptable in the future. Comorbidities associated with psoriasis, such as diabetes, depression, and Crohn disease, and the debate about the interdependence of psoriasis and cardiovascular disease will also dictate future research and holistic and management plans for this complex disease. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Pharmacogenomics and the Resulting Impact on Psoriasis Therapies

Psoriasis is a model disease for the development of pharmacogenomic markers of treatment response, with ready access to diseased tissue and objective validated outcome measures. With the application of state-of-the-art technologies and investment in careful experimental design, the goal of stratified medicine in psoriasis may be possible. Current pharmacogenomic studies in psoriasis show excellence in many areas, including the investigation of a broad range of psoriasis therapies. To facilitate the advent of stratified medicine in psoriasis, uniformity of study design is required, with high quality, consistent phenotyping strategies for participants; definitions of outcome; and the publication of reproducible methodologies. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Psoriatic Arthritis for the Dermatologist

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory spondyloarthropathy that affects approximately one-third of patients with all types of psoriasis. Dermatologists are in a unique position to recognize early symptoms of PsA, initiate appropriate therapy, and prevent development of further disability. The course of PsA can be modulated by immunosuppressive therapy; patients with moderate-to-severe disease require aggressive management with medications proven to halt disease progression. It is essential for the dermatologist to understand the safety, tolerability, efficacy, cost, and potential to halt disease progression with available medications for this relatively common and potentially disabling disease. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Index

Note: Page numbers of article titles are in boldface type. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Forthcoming Issues

Nail Disorders: Practical Tips for Diagnosis and Treatment (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Contents

M. Alan Menter and Christopher E. M. Griffiths (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

Contributors

BRUCE H. THIERS, MD (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:57PM

CpGB DNA activates dermal macrophages and specifically recruits inflammatory monocytes into the skin

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: Experimental Dermatology)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Photodynamic Therapy for the Prevention of Skin Cancer

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Successful Cosmetic Ablation of Xanthelasma Palpebrarum With Low-Voltage Radiofrequency: Back to the Basics!

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Intravascular Papillary Endothelial Hyperplasia Presenting in a Mohs Surgical Scar

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Unique Basaloid Findings During Mohs Surgery for Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Dermatopathology Challenge

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Dermatological Surgery?Time for Single-Use Instruments?

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Subungual Lipoma: Presenting as Longitudinal Nail Splitting

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Enucleation of Cylindromas in Brooke?Spiegler Syndrome: A Novel Surgical Technique

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Nonablative 1,450-nm Diode Laser Treatment for Xanthoma Disseminatum

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Repigmentation of Vitiligo Using the Follicular Unit Extraction Technique

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

A Reference (All-in-One) Image Demonstrating the Outcome of Suction Blister Formation in Vitiligo Surgery

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Free Margin Distortion With Fusiform Closures: The Apical Angle Relationship

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Multiple Staged Tie-Over Dressing for Penile Skin Grafting Using Silk Threads

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Bottle Opener Flap for Medial Canthal Defect

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)

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Nov 25, 2014 02:56PM

Eyebrow Transplants: The Use of Nape and Periauricular Hair in 6 Patients

No abstract available (Source: Dermatologic Surgery)